I just don’t even know what to say about dear Gwyneth’s thoughts on a working mom with an “office job.” UGH. 

ilovecharts:

March Madness: The Tournament of Upper-Middle Class Afflictions
This week: Jessica gets to know the cosmos, on a personal level
juliegirlie:

abrittann:

Maxi Cardigan // Poliennne


I love this long blunt bob.  Wish I could easily pull if off.  My hair would look like a permed triangle if I didn’t straighten it every day though, and that ain’t happenin’.

Hair inspiration

juliegirlie:

abrittann:

Maxi Cardigan // Poliennne

I love this long blunt bob. Wish I could easily pull if off. My hair would look like a permed triangle if I didn’t straighten it every day though, and that ain’t happenin’.

Hair inspiration

emilyposts:

Slow clap.

Hooray for being 2!!! /p>

Hooray for being 2!!! /p>

georgiegirlnyc:

Saw this on Facebook. Thought it was brilliant. I immediately turned everything backwards. I’m ready. 

I’m obsessed with streamlining my closet. I already did a major clean out a few months ago, donated bag loads of stuff, sold the good stuff on eBay and the things I couldn’t let go of were hung up in the guest bedroom closet. Anything still in that closet at the end of the year will be donated.

georgiegirlnyc:

Saw this on Facebook. Thought it was brilliant. I immediately turned everything backwards. I’m ready.

I’m obsessed with streamlining my closet. I already did a major clean out a few months ago, donated bag loads of stuff, sold the good stuff on eBay and the things I couldn’t let go of were hung up in the guest bedroom closet. Anything still in that closet at the end of the year will be donated.

cupofchi:

Pizza and Wine Guide | viaheelsonfriday & ilovecharts

Tonight’s plans. Necessary.

cupofchi:

Pizza and Wine Guide | viaheelsonfriday & ilovecharts

Tonight’s plans. Necessary.

(via jacquesofalltrades)

jacquesofalltrades:

Liz made this fantastic slow-cooked salmon, greens and chickpeas dish for dinner last night. One-pot meal, took just over 30 minutes, super healthy, and outrageously flavorful.  I can’t recommend it highly enough.

It didn’t hurt that instead of salmon, she was using a delicious piece of Arctic char from the new District Fishwife stand at Union Market.  Two other nice touches: a mix of mustard, collard, and turnip greens; and whole grain dijon in the dressing.

The original recipe is from Bobby Flay, in this month’s issue of Bon Appetit:

ingredients

Salmon:
2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more
1 15.5-ounce can chickpeas, rinsed
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
1 garlic clove, thinly sliced
1 small bunch mustard greens, ribs and stems removed, leaves coarsely chopped
1 teaspoon honey
4 6-ounce skinless salmon fillets

Vinaigrette and assembly:
1/2 small shallot, very finely chopped
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon honey
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup vegetable oil
2 tablespoons capers, rinsed, patted dry

preparation

For salmon: 
Preheat oven to 250°F. Brush a large baking dish with oil. Combine chickpeas, cumin, and 1 tablespoon oil in a medium bowl. Mash about half of chickpeas with a fork; season with salt and pepper. Transfer chickpea mixture to prepared dish.

Heat remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook garlic, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add mustard greens and cook, tossing, until slightly wilted, about 1 minute. Add honey and 1/4 cup water; season with salt and pepper. Cook, tossing, until greens are completely wilted, about 2 minutes. Transfer to dish with chickpea mixture.
Season salmon with salt and pepper; arrange over greens and chickpea mixture and drizzle with oil. Bake until salmon is opaque in the center, 30–35 minutes.
For vinaigrette and assembly:
Whisk shallot, lemon juice, mustard, and honey in a small bowl; season with salt and pepper. Gradually whisk in olive oil; season with salt and pepper.
Heat vegetable oil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Cook capers until opened and crisp, about 30 seconds; drain on paper towels.
Drizzle salmon with vinaigrette and top with capers.

Read More http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Slow-Cooked-Salmon-Chickpeas-and-Greens-51224050#ixzz2uOWo212Z

I need to make this!

jacquesofalltrades:

Liz made this fantastic slow-cooked salmon, greens and chickpeas dish for dinner last night. One-pot meal, took just over 30 minutes, super healthy, and outrageously flavorful. I can’t recommend it highly enough.

It didn’t hurt that instead of salmon, she was using a delicious piece of Arctic char from the new District Fishwife stand at Union Market. Two other nice touches: a mix of mustard, collard, and turnip greens; and whole grain dijon in the dressing.

The original recipe is from Bobby Flay, in this month’s issue of Bon Appetit:

ingredients

Salmon: 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more 1 15.5-ounce can chickpeas, rinsed 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper 1 garlic clove, thinly sliced 1 small bunch mustard greens, ribs and stems removed, leaves coarsely chopped 1 teaspoon honey 4 6-ounce skinless salmon fillets

Vinaigrette and assembly: 1/2 small shallot, very finely chopped 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1/2 teaspoon honey Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper 1/4 cup olive oil 1/4 cup vegetable oil 2 tablespoons capers, rinsed, patted dry

preparation

For salmon: Preheat oven to 250°F. Brush a large baking dish with oil. Combine chickpeas, cumin, and 1 tablespoon oil in a medium bowl. Mash about half of chickpeas with a fork; season with salt and pepper. Transfer chickpea mixture to prepared dish.

Heat remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook garlic, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add mustard greens and cook, tossing, until slightly wilted, about 1 minute. Add honey and 1/4 cup water; season with salt and pepper. Cook, tossing, until greens are completely wilted, about 2 minutes. Transfer to dish with chickpea mixture. Season salmon with salt and pepper; arrange over greens and chickpea mixture and drizzle with oil. Bake until salmon is opaque in the center, 30–35 minutes. For vinaigrette and assembly: Whisk shallot, lemon juice, mustard, and honey in a small bowl; season with salt and pepper. Gradually whisk in olive oil; season with salt and pepper. Heat vegetable oil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Cook capers until opened and crisp, about 30 seconds; drain on paper towels. Drizzle salmon with vinaigrette and top with capers.

Read More http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Slow-Cooked-Salmon-Chickpeas-and-Greens-51224050#ixzz2uOWo212Z

I need to make this!

thegreatworldofmelissa:

losingwins:

pleatedjeans:

22 Hilarious Ways Toddlers Have Mispronounced Words

Enzo calls the kitchen, chichen and now so do we.

D totally calls the elevator the alligator.  So cute!

maptitude1:

This map shows iPhone vs Android usage in Washington, DC., with red representing iPhone users and blue showing Android users.
Article with more US cities

maptitude1:

This map shows iPhone vs Android usage in Washington, DC., with red representing iPhone users and blue showing Android users.

Article with more US cities

(Source: mapsontheweb, via ilovecharts)

everyday-k:

nprfreshair:

Today our guest Jennifer Senior discusses the “paradox of modern parenthood,” which is the subject of her new book All Joy and No Fun. In today’s interview she talks about how parenting has changed over time. Here she explains how the linguistic shift from “housewife” to “stay-at-home-mom” influenced the culture of parenting: 

In the 1960s if you stayed home with your kids, what were you? You were a “housewife.” You focused on your house. You didn’t focus on your kids. You focused on your house. Your house had to be clean. You had to master the differences between oven cleaners and floor waxes and stuff that made your wood nice and shiny but you put your kids in a playpen, that’s what you did.
And now if you stay home with your kids, you are a “stay-at-home-mom,” you focus on your kids. You are a professional mom and you focus on the right toys for your kids, the right educational things for your kids. So all the women who are working, when they’re not working they want to be professional moms too so they’re pouring all of this energy into their children in their off hours. And by the way, their houses are suffering. Their houses are a mess. If you look at the American Time Use Surveys, no one takes care of their house anymore. That’s a very clear downward slope.


Adding to my library list

everyday-k:

nprfreshair:

Today our guest Jennifer Senior discusses the “paradox of modern parenthood,” which is the subject of her new book All Joy and No Fun. In today’s interview she talks about how parenting has changed over time. Here she explains how the linguistic shift from “housewife” to “stay-at-home-mom” influenced the culture of parenting: 

In the 1960s if you stayed home with your kids, what were you? You were a “housewife.” You focused on your house. You didn’t focus on your kids. You focused on your house. Your house had to be clean. You had to master the differences between oven cleaners and floor waxes and stuff that made your wood nice and shiny but you put your kids in a playpen, that’s what you did.

And now if you stay home with your kids, you are a “stay-at-home-mom,” you focus on your kids. You are a professional mom and you focus on the right toys for your kids, the right educational things for your kids. So all the women who are working, when they’re not working they want to be professional moms too so they’re pouring all of this energy into their children in their off hours. And by the way, their houses are suffering. Their houses are a mess. If you look at the American Time Use Surveys, no one takes care of their house anymore. That’s a very clear downward slope.

Adding to my library list

foodandwine:

© Christina Holmes
Brunch Upgrade: Ready in just 30 minutes, this hearty frittata features crispy bacon and brussels sprouts.
Recipe: Brussels Sprout, Bacon and Gruyère Frittata

foodandwine:

© Christina Holmes

Brunch Upgrade: Ready in just 30 minutes, this hearty frittata features crispy bacon and brussels sprouts.

Recipe: Brussels Sprout, Bacon and Gruyère Frittata

bees-knees:

sweet. that last frame.

(Source: thinkofmewhenuforgetyourseatbelt)

youphoric:

humans are so cute, when we say goodbye we put our arms around each other and to show we love someone we bring them flowers. we say hello by holding each other’s hand, and sometimes tiny little dewdrops form in our eyes. for pleasure we listen to arrangements of sounds, press our lips together, smoke dried leaves, get drunk off of old fruit. we’re all just little animals, falling in love and having breakfast beneath billions of stars 

(via relovingit)

howshedoesit:

apsies:

audgy:

thestarslightmyway:

allthingslinguistic:

It’s almost as fun looking at years and decades that aren’t your own: who knew that “nuanced” has only been around since 1902, or that “celeb” has been with us since 1913? Or “podcast” in 2004? That’s the birth year of a ten year old! Why, I remember when the iPods that those were named after didn’t even exist!

My word is “air guitar”… I feel ancient yet totally radical, dude.

My word is “downloadable.”

Channel surf, which happens to be something I’m currently doing.

My word is “reboot” which makes me seem much, much younger than I am. Honestly, would never have guessed that word originated in 1971. I’m willing to guessing not to many people who were around and talking in 1971 didn’t know it either.

Fittingly, my word is “foodie.”

Me and my 1980-born self can live with that.